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Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs-2014The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs—2014 is an evidence-based guide to help states plan and establish effective tobacco control programs to prevent and reduce tobacco use. This document updates Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs—2007. This updated edition describes an integrated programmatic structure for implementing interventions proven to be effective and provides levels of state investment to prevent and reduce tobacco use in each state.

Recommended Program Intervention Budget for New Hampshire
2014
CDC Recommended Annual Investment for NH
$16.5 million
Deaths in New Hampshire Caused by Smoking  
Annual average smoking-attributable deaths
1,700
Youth ages 0 - 17 projected to die from smoking
21,700
Annual Costs Incurred in New Hampshire from Smoking  
Total medical
$729 million
State Revenue from Tobacco Excise Taxes and Settlement  
FY 2012 tobacco tax revenue
$215.1 million
FY 2012 tobacco settlement payment
$42.5 million
Total state revenue from tobacco excise taxes and settlement
$257.6 million
Percent tobacco revenue to fund at CDC recommended level
6%
   
 
Per Capita Recommendation
I. State and Community Interventions
$3.79
Multiple societal resources working together have the greatest long-term population impact.  
II. Health Communication Interventions
$3.10
Media interventions prevent tobacco use initiation, promote cessation, and shape social norms.  
III. Cessation Interventions
$4.01
Tobacco use treatment is highly cost-effective.  
IV. Surveillance and Evaluation
$1.09
Publicly financed programs should be accountable and demonstrate effectiveness.  
V. Administration and Management
$0.55
Complex, integrated programs require experienced staff to provide fiscal management, accountability, and coordination.  
Total
$12.54

Note: A justification for each program element and the rationale for the budget estimates are provided in Section A. The funding estimates pre­sented are based on adjustments for changes in population and cost-of-living increases since Best Practices — 2007 was published. The actual funding required for implementing programs will vary depending on state characteristics, such as prevalence of tobacco use, sociodemographic factors, and other factors. See Appendix E for data sources on deaths, costs, revenue, and state-specific factors.

Citation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control Programs — 2014. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014.

 

 


 
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