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US Surgeon General Reports on Tobacco Use

Surgeon General's Report on Smoking and Health - 50th Anniversary: 1964-2014The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General, 2014

A PERSISTENT EPIDEMIC BUT A WINNABLE PUBLIC HEALTH BATTLE. Every adult who dies early because of smoking is replaced by two new, young smokers, one of whom also will die early from smoking.

We have known for the last 50 years that people who smoke cigarettes are much more likely to develop—and die from—certain diseases than people who don’t smoke. More than 20 million Americans have died because of smoking since the first Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health was issued in 1964. Most of those deaths were of adults who smoked, but 2.5 million were of nonsmokers who died because they breathed secondhand smoke—air that was polluted by other people’s cigarette smoke.
Read the new report, executive summary, consumer guide, and find resources around the new report at: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/reports/50-years-of-progress/index.html

2012 Surgeon General's Report2012 Surgeon General's Report: Preventing Tobacco Use Among Youth and Young Adults

This report details the scope, health consequences and influences that lead to youth tobacco use and proven strategies that prevent its use.

To help communicate the report findings and steps every American can take to join the fight against youth tobacco use, the surgeon general also unveiled a guide with practical information on addressing tobacco use in young people, Preventing Tobacco Use Among Youth and Young Adults: We Can Make the Next Generation Tobacco-Free. In addition, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Office on Smoking and Health will launch the Surgeon General’s Video Challenge to engage youth and young adults in developing original videos that feature one or more of the report’s findings. More information can be found at www.Challenge.gov.

Copies of the full Report, executive summary, and the easy-to-read guide may be downloaded at http://www.surgeongeneral.gov. To order printed copies of these documents go to http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco and click on the Publications Catalog link under Tools & Resources. For access to quitting resources visit www.smokefree.gov.

2010 How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease
A Report of the Surgeon General

Exposure to tobacco smoke – even occasional smoking or secondhand smoke – causes immediate damage to your body that can lead to serious illness or death, according to a report released by U.S. Surgeon General Regina M. Benjamin. The comprehensive scientific report – Benjamin's first Surgeon General's report and the 30th tobacco-related Surgeon General's report issued since 1964 – describes pathways by which tobacco smoke damages the human body and leads to disease and death.

The report, How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease, finds that cellular damage and tissue inflammation from tobacco smoke are immediate, and that repeated exposure weakens the body's ability to heal the damage.

 

 

 

 
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