skip navigation Smaller text size Reset text size Larger text size
Families & Children Women Teens Adults Seniors People with Disabilities
Press Release

According to CDC Data New Hampshire Has Lowest Rate of Repeat Teen Births
Contact:
Public Information Office
(603) 271-9391

Visit us on FacebookFollow us on TwitterFollow us on Twitter
Maternal and Child Health
Publish Date:
April 2, 2013

Concord, NH – According to a new Vital Signs report of teen births issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention today, New Hampshire has the lowest rate in the nation of repeat births among teenagers. The report states that nearly 1 in 5 births among teenagers are not their first child. The rate in New Hampshire is in the below 15% category along with Maine, New York, Wyoming, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Vermont.

The study looked at births to girls ages 15-19 in 2010 in the U.S. Although teen births are at historic lows, among the 364,859 births to teens in 2010, 18.3% were repeat births, with 85.7% of those being second children, and 12.6% third children. Births to teen mothers present many potential health, emotional, financial, and social consequences, such as an increased rate of premature birth and low birth weight, and constraints on the mother’s education and employment possibilities. Teen births can change the health and lives of the mothers, the children, and families.

“The good news is that the rate of teen births in New Hampshire and in our country is going down, but each teen birth still has an impact on our families and in our communities.” said Dr. José Montero, Director of Public Health at the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services, “Data such as this helps all of us in public health to determine what can be done to make improvements. There is more we all can do to help prevent unintended pregnancies.”

To read the entire report, go to www.cdc.gov/features/VitalSigns/teenpregnancy. For more information about the DHHS Division of Public Health Services and Maternal and Child Health Program visit www.dhhs.nh.gov.

 
Translate this page

Disclaimer

New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services
129 Pleasant Street | Concord, NH | 03301-3852


copyright 2010. State of New Hampshire