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Celebrate World TB DayIt’s TIMEEach year, we recognize World TB Day on March 24. This annual event commemorates the date in 1882 when Dr. Robert Koch announced his discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacillus that causes tuberculosis (TB).

Although TB is preventable and curable, many people in the United States still suffer from this disease. Anyone can get TB, and our current efforts to find and treat latent TB infection and TB disease are not sufficient. Misdiagnosis of TB still exists and health care professionals often do not “think TB.”

The theme of World TB Day 2019 is “It’s TIME” CDC and its domestic and international partners, including the National TB Controllers Association External, Stop TB USA External, and the global Stop TB Partnership External are working together to eliminate this deadly disease. But we need your help.

It’s time to test and treat latent TB infection.
Up to 13 million people in the United States have latent TB infection, and without treatment, they are at risk for developing TB disease in the future. We must continue to find and treat cases of active TB disease and also test and treat latent TB infection to prevent progression to disease

It’s time we strengthen TB education and awareness among health care providers.
Treatment of latent TB infection is essential to controlling and eliminating TB in the United States. Our public health system and private providers play a crucial role in this effort.

It’s time to speak up.
On September 26, 2018, the United Nations General Assembly held the first-ever High Level Meeting (UN HLM)External on ending TB globally. CDC is committed to increasing efforts to test and treat persons with latent TB infection to prevent TB disease.

It’s time to end stigma.
Stigma associated with TB disease may also place certain populations at higher risk. Stigma may keep people from seeking medical care or follow-up care for TB.

 
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