Substance Misuse Treatment Services

Information about types of substance misuse treatment programs in NH, how to access treatment programs, and resources if you are uninsured or underinsured.

The treatment system in NH consists of an array of levels of care including outpatient, intensive outpatient, partial hospitalization, residential, withdrawal management, and peer and non-peer recovery support services.  Many of these services are paid for by public and/or private insurance programs as well as funding from the Department to assist individuals with accessing treatment services.  

Service Types

Types of Outpatient

  • Outpatient (OP) 
  • Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) 
  • Intensive Outpatient (IOP) 
  • Outpatient Withdrawal Management (OWM)
  • Opioid Treatment Programs (OTP)
  • Partial Hospitalization (PH) 
     

Types of Residential

  • Low Intensity (LI)
  • High Intensity (HI) 
  • Pregnant & Parenting Women (PPW)
  • Withdrawal Management (WM) 
  • Residential Medication-Assisted Treatment (RMAT) 
     

Description of Services

Outpatient

  • Outpatient: Outpatient (OP) programs typically require regular counseling services at a clinic or facility and allow clients to return to their homes or other living arrangements during non-treatment hours.
  • Medication-Assisted Treatment: Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) combines behavioral therapy and medications to treat substance use disorders.
  • Intensive Outpatient: Intensive Outpatient (IOP) programs typically provide participants with a minimum of nine hours for adults and six hours for adolescents. An IOP may be structured for individual and / or group services and activities, according to an individualized treatment plan.
  • Opioid Treatment Programs: Opioid Treatment Programs (OTPs) offer treatment for people diagnosed with an opioid use disorder using the medication methadone or other FDA approved medications. The State of New Hampshire works closely with OTPs, but does not contract with them to provide services.
  • Outpatient Withdrawal Management: Outpatient Withdrawal Management (OWM) is often provided by a physician’s office, substance use disorder treatment facility, or by home health care agency. Although the service is medically supervised, clients are permitted to return to their homes or other living arrangements during non-treatment hours. It is important that clients are motivated for treatment and have adequate in-home and community supports.
  • Partial Hospitalization: Partial hospitalization (PH) is a combination of 20 or more hours per week of group and individual sessions in conjunction with medical and psychiatric services, psychopharmacological services, medication assisted treatment, and recovery support services.

 

Residential

  • Low Intensity: Low-Intensity (LI) residential treatment is designed to prepare clients to become self-sufficient in the community. Services include at least five hours of clinical services per week. Adult residents typically work in the community and may pay a portion of their room and board.
  • High Intensity: High-Intensity (HI) residential treatment is designed to assist individuals who require a more intensive level of service in a structured setting including individual and/or group counseling, educational sessions, psychiatric, medical and medication management, as needed.
  • Pregnant & Parenting Women: Pregnant & Parenting Women (PPW) treatment is specifically designed for expectant and parenting women with residential facilities that have been developed using a family-centered approach, and many times allow mothers to care for their young children on-site.
  • Withdrawal Management: Residential Withdrawal Management (WM) is designed for clients who require 24-hour monitoring of their withdrawal symptoms, a structured, safe environment, and ongoing clinical and / or medical supervision. The length of stay is determined by an individual’s needs and the severity of his or her withdrawal symptoms.
  • Residential Medication-Assisted Treatment: Residential Medication-Assisted Treatment (RMAT) combines behavioral therapy and medications to treat substance use disorders in a supervised clinical facility.
  • Transitional Living Services: Transitional Living Services provide residential substance use disorder treatment services according to an individualized treatment plan designed to support individuals as they transition back into the community. Transitional Living services must include at least three (3) hours of clinical services per week. The maximum length of stay in this service is six (6) months. Adult residents typically work in the community and may pay a portion of their room and board.

 

Treatment Facilities

Residential

Outpatient

 

Online Resources

The Doorways

Whether you are seeking help for yourself or a loved one, or are simply looking for information on resources related to substance misuse, http://thedoorway.nh.gov is the right place. Doorways NH will direct you to the help you need, from screening to treatment including medication-assisted treatment, to recovery supports.
 

2-1-1 NH

2-1-1 NH is the connection for New Hampshire residents to the most up to date resources they need from specially trained Information and Referral Specialists.
 

The Recovery Friendly Workplace

Promotes individual wellness for Granite Staters by empowering workplaces to provide support for people recovering from substance use disorder.