Information for Property Owners

Information and resources regarding the Lead Paint Prevention and Control Act of 1993 which grants DPHS the authority to inspect rental dwelling units and licensed child care facilities for the presence of lead exposure hazards involving children

Formal efforts for the control of childhood lead poisoning in New Hampshire began with the adoption of RSA 130-A (Lead Paint Prevention and Control Act of 1993). This statute provides the DPHS the authority to inspect rental dwelling units and licensed child care facilities for the presence of lead exposure hazards when a child 72 months and younger has a venous blood lead level of 5 µg/dL or higher.

Homes and apartments built before 1978 may contain lead paint. If you rent homes or apartments built before 1978, you have an important responsibility to maintain your property as well as follow all applicable laws including the EPA/HUD disclosure rule and the EPA Renovation, Repair, and Painting Rule to help reduce the likelihood of a child being exposed to lead. Maintaining your property and doing your part to prevent childhood lead poisoning helps to protect your investment.

In NH, when lead exposure hazards are identified in a rental property with a resident child 72 month and younger with a venous blood lead level of 5 µg/dL or higher, the DPHS issues an Administrative Order of Lead Hazard Reduction (Order) to the property owner. 

In NH, lead exposure hazards are defined as:

  • Deteriorated lead-based paint including paint that is peeling, chipping, chalking or cracking.
  • Lead-based paint on surfaces, such as windows and doors, that are subject to friction or impact.
  • Lead based paint located on chewable surfaces such as windowsills.
  • Bare soil in children’s play areas that has equal to or greater than 400 parts per million (ppm) of lead or 1200 ppm average of lead for bare soil in the rest of the yard.

When a property is under Order, the property owner cannot re-rent the dwelling or dwelling unit if it becomes vacant. The Order remains with the property, recorded on the Registry of Deeds, until all the lead exposure hazards have been addressed. Unless the property owner decides to remove the property from the rental market or requests approval of another abatement alternative, NH law requires property owners to address the lead-exposure hazards in 90 days by:

  1. Hiring a NH Licensed Risk Assessor to test the property and identify all the lead exposure hazards;
  2. Having a scope of work and Occupant Protection Plan developed;
  3. Hiring a NH Licensed Lead Abatement Contractor to address all the lead exposure hazards using approved abatement methods. (Property owners must become licensed themselves if they would like to conduct lead abatement work on their property); and
  4. Hiring a NH Licensed Risk Assessor or Lead Inspector to perform a clearance inspection and verify that all the lead exposure hazards have been addressed.

Funding is available to assist property owners with the cost of abatement through various HUD grant and loan programs throughout the State. Below you will find links to the available HUD grant programs and forms for property owners who have been issued an Order.